The Protein Problem, Part 5: How to Get Enough Protein From a Vegan Diet

Read The Protein Problem, Part 4: Animal Protein and Cancer.

     Many people are worried that they will not get enough protein if they only eat a plant-based diet. However, it is not only meat that contains protein, plants do too. And according to Dr. Campbell, it is almost impossible not to get enough protein from a vegan diet (1). Even a potato, which does not contain much protein when compared to other foods, still has 8% of its calories as protein, and the recommended amount is 10%. According to what Goldhamer says, it is easy to get enough protein as long as one eats enough calories even if one does not eat nuts or beans, the two sources of concentrated protein from plants (2).
    The secret behind a vegan diet is to eat a variation of different foods. As opposed to meat, most vegetables are low in at least one of the essential amino acids, and this deficiency is just what protects against cancer and other diseases. As long as the diet is varied, one will get all the amino acids needed over time. But even if one would eat only rice, 15 1/2 c. (3 1/2 l.) cooked brown rice would supply enough of all the needed amino acids for one day (3). One only needs to eat eight large potatoes or 2 1/2 c. (6 dl.) tofu a day to cover the need. Of course, with this diet, one would get an excess of some amino acids, but the need for every single one will be covered. As is obvious, this is not a realistic example; it just illustrates that if it is possible to get all the needed amino acids from just one plant, then how much more from a varied array! In this context, it is good to keep in mind Campbell's advise; he says, "Food-based nutrition is far, far more important in health than nutrient-based nutrition" (4). It is much more important to focus on making good choices regarding which kind of food to eat than to focus on which specific nutrients in which specific amounts are in the food.

     The body needs protein, but not very much. It has been shown that too much protein, especially animal protein, is a cause of many of the degenerative diseases known today. On the other hand, plant protein seems to counter these same diseases, and a varied, plant-based diet can easily give all the healthy proteins the body needs. "It is ironic," says Goldhamer, "that the chief argument used to promote the use of animal products – that is, the purported need for large quantities of protein – is the greatest reason for avoiding them" (5).

The END! Look forward to more health-related information in the near future!


(1) Campbell, T. Colin, PhD. "The Protein Puzzle: Picking up the Pieces." August 1, 1995. http://nutritionstudies.org/protein-puzzle-picking-pieces/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(2) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(3) Mangels, Reed, Ph.D., RD. "Protein in the Vegan Diet." http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.php (Accessed May 14, 2014)
(4) Campbell, T. Colin, Ph.D. "Animal vs. Plant Protein." October 29, 2013. http://nutritionstudies.org/animal-vs-plant-protein/ (Accessed May 14, 2014)
(5) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)

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Creative Vegan Cooking: The Protein Problem, Part 5: How to Get Enough Protein From a Vegan Diet

Monday, June 30, 2014

The Protein Problem, Part 5: How to Get Enough Protein From a Vegan Diet

Read The Protein Problem, Part 4: Animal Protein and Cancer.

     Many people are worried that they will not get enough protein if they only eat a plant-based diet. However, it is not only meat that contains protein, plants do too. And according to Dr. Campbell, it is almost impossible not to get enough protein from a vegan diet (1). Even a potato, which does not contain much protein when compared to other foods, still has 8% of its calories as protein, and the recommended amount is 10%. According to what Goldhamer says, it is easy to get enough protein as long as one eats enough calories even if one does not eat nuts or beans, the two sources of concentrated protein from plants (2).
    The secret behind a vegan diet is to eat a variation of different foods. As opposed to meat, most vegetables are low in at least one of the essential amino acids, and this deficiency is just what protects against cancer and other diseases. As long as the diet is varied, one will get all the amino acids needed over time. But even if one would eat only rice, 15 1/2 c. (3 1/2 l.) cooked brown rice would supply enough of all the needed amino acids for one day (3). One only needs to eat eight large potatoes or 2 1/2 c. (6 dl.) tofu a day to cover the need. Of course, with this diet, one would get an excess of some amino acids, but the need for every single one will be covered. As is obvious, this is not a realistic example; it just illustrates that if it is possible to get all the needed amino acids from just one plant, then how much more from a varied array! In this context, it is good to keep in mind Campbell's advise; he says, "Food-based nutrition is far, far more important in health than nutrient-based nutrition" (4). It is much more important to focus on making good choices regarding which kind of food to eat than to focus on which specific nutrients in which specific amounts are in the food.

     The body needs protein, but not very much. It has been shown that too much protein, especially animal protein, is a cause of many of the degenerative diseases known today. On the other hand, plant protein seems to counter these same diseases, and a varied, plant-based diet can easily give all the healthy proteins the body needs. "It is ironic," says Goldhamer, "that the chief argument used to promote the use of animal products – that is, the purported need for large quantities of protein – is the greatest reason for avoiding them" (5).

The END! Look forward to more health-related information in the near future!


(1) Campbell, T. Colin, PhD. "The Protein Puzzle: Picking up the Pieces." August 1, 1995. http://nutritionstudies.org/protein-puzzle-picking-pieces/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(2) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)
(3) Mangels, Reed, Ph.D., RD. "Protein in the Vegan Diet." http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.php (Accessed May 14, 2014)
(4) Campbell, T. Colin, Ph.D. "Animal vs. Plant Protein." October 29, 2013. http://nutritionstudies.org/animal-vs-plant-protein/ (Accessed May 14, 2014)
(5) Goldhamer, Alan, D.C. "Where Do You Get Your Protein?" October 15, 1997. http://nutritionstudies.org/get-protein-where/ (Accessed May 12, 2014)

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